Update of Jeanie’s situation on her Caring Bridge web page

A lot of you are asking for news and updates of the situation in Prague, or how you can help. Everything is now centralized in a Caring Bridge web page for Jeanie. We are keeping the Morrison, Spronk, and Wetzell families in our thoughts and wish Jeanie a full and quick recovery.

Dr. Morrison’s wife, Jeanie no longer in life threatening condition

We are trying to give you a daily update on the situation regarding the auto accident that happened in Prague on Tuesday and lead to Dr. Morrison’s passing.

As of today, Jeanie Morrison, Dr. Morrison’s wife, is no longer in a life-threatening condition said the doctors in charge of her recovery. We do not have any further information but the Morrison family is in the process of creating a online information page to provide updates on Jeanie’s situation. We will add the link here when it is available.

Thank you everyone for your support.

Edit: The Caring Bridge web page is here.

Passing of Dr. Robert Morrison, colleague, friend, and international leader in the swine industry

Bob_Morrison
Dr. Bob Morrison

The University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine is mourning the death of Dr. Robert Morrison, a faculty member in its Department of Veterinary Population Medicine.  Dr. Morrison, his wife and several companions were involved in an auto accident north of Prague in the Czech Republic.  They were traveling prior to attending a swine health management conference in Prague.  “Dr. Morrison was an international leader in the swine industry,” says Dr. Trevor Ames, dean of the college. “This is a tragic loss for the strong team of students and faculty that Bob helped us build.  Our thoughts and prayers are with the Morrison family.”

Dr. Morrison was hired by the University of Minnesota in 1986 and recently launched the Swine Health Monitoring Project, which provides weekly reports on the health status of over 50% of the U.S. sow herds.  Dr. Morrison also coordinated two internationally-respected swine health management conferences: the St. Paul, MN-based Allen D. Leman Swine Conference and the Leman China Conference in Nanjing, China.  The conferences are named for UM professor Dr. Al Leman, who served as Dr. Morrison’s graduate advisor.

Mycoplasma hyorhinis prevalence varies based on pigs’ age

Summary

  • Mycoplasma hyorhinis can cause polyserositis and arthritis in post-weaning pigs.
  • To study M.hyorhinis‘ prevalence based on age, nasal swabs were taken from pigs at 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70 and 77 days as well as from sows, in 3 different Minnesotan herds (A, B, and C).
  • 8.8% of the sows were positive for M.hyorhinis in herds A and B whereas 3.3% of the sows were positive in herd C.
  • The percentage of positive piglets (<21 days of age) was low: between 0 and 10% depending on the herds.
  • At 28 days of age, the prevalence of M.hyorhinis in pigs increased dramatically to around 50% in herd A and 100% in herd B. After 42 days of age, the prevalence in those herds stayed above 95%.
  • The prevalence in herd C stayed close to 0% until the pigs reached the age of 77 days, time at which the prevalence increased to 100%.

Did you see our Science page on Mycoplasma hyorhinis and swine conjunctivitis?

Mhyorhinis prevalence baed on age Rovira 2017

Abstract

Mycoplasma hyorhinis is one of the causative agents of polyserositis and arthritis in postweaning pigs. Knowledge regarding colonization frequency and age distribution in modern pig production is lacking. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of M hyorhinis colonization in different age groups across three commercial pig populations. Nasal swabs were collected from sows, piglets and nursery pigs of different ages. Oral fluids were collected from nursery pigs. Necropsies were performed to assess the presence of M hyorhinis-associated disease. M hyorhinis was detected in 5/60 sows in herd A, 3/60 in herd B and none in herd C. In herd A and B, the prevalence was low in preweaning piglets (∼8 per cent) and high in postweaning pigs (∼98 per cent). A total of 7/8 oral fluids tested PCR positive in herds A and B, while 1/8 tested positive in herd C. In herd C, the preweaning and postweaning prevalence was low. In herds A and B, necropsied pigs had polyserositis lesions where M hyorhinis was detected by PCR. This study showed that prevalence of M hyorhinis colonization varies with pig age and across farms. Information generated will aid in the design and implementation of control and prevention strategies.

Link to the full paper

Science page: Evaluation of positive pressure filtration to reduce aerosol transmission of PRRSV during an experimental challenge of farm access points

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points from this week edition:

  • Dilute vaccine aerosolization combined with novel environmental sampling techniques allowed for testing of PRRSV aerosol entry into Positive Pressure Filtration (PPF) farm access points.
  • Under the experimental conditions of this study, positive pressure air speeds >1.85m/s resulted in no aerosol transmission.
  • Ensuring adequate positive pressure air speed through steps taken to increase access point pressure can further reduce the risk of aerosol PRRSV transmission on PPF farms.

The full report on positive pressure filtration and PRRSV transmission via aerosols is available.

Detecting Senecavirus A in tissues: development of a new diagnostic test at the University of Minnesota

Summary

In Canada and the USA alike, Senecavirus A is a challenge for producers and veterinarians because of its clinical similarity to Food and Mouth Disease (FMD). Indeed, Senecavirus A, is a causative agent of swine vesicular disease with lesions developing on the snout, around the mouth and on the coronary band of the feet. Therefore, being able to differentiate Senecavirus A infections from FMD rapidly is of utmost importance to be able to take the appropriate measures.

In the past months, several diagnostic tests have been developed at the University of Minnesota to detect antibodies against Senecavirus A. The difference between those tests and the in situ hybridization (ISH) described here is that ISH targets the genetic material included in the viral particle and marks it as a red spot as can be seen on the figure below. This advantage of this method is to be able to locate the virus and gives additional information to researcher wanting to study the behavior of Senecavirus A in the body of the pig.

in situ hybridization senecavirus A pigs
Red dots and clusters represent the presence of SVV mRNA within an erosive lesion on the tongue of a pig © 2017 Resende et al.

Abstract

Seneca Valley virus (SVV) is the causative agent of an emerging vesicular disease in swine, which is clinically indistinguishable from other vesicular diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease. In addition, SVV has been associated with neonatal mortality in piglets. While a commercial SVV qRT-PCR is available, commercial antibodies are lacking to diagnose SVV infections by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Thus, a novel in situ hybridization technique—RNAscope (ISH) was developed to detect SVVRNA in infected tissues. From a total of 78 samples evaluated, 30 were positive by qRT-PCR and ISH-RNA, including vesicular lesions of affected sows, ulcerative lesions in the tongue of piglets and various other tissues with no evidence of histological lesions. Nineteen samples were negative for SVV by qRT-PCR and ISH-RNA. The Ct values of the qRT-PCR from ISH-RNA positive tissues varied from 12.0 to 32.6 (5.12 x 106 to 5.31 RNA copies/g, respectively). The ISH-RNA technique is an important tool in diagnosing and investigating the pathogenesis of SVV and other emerging pathogens.

Link to the full article

Science page: M. hyopneumoniae outbreaks: what you need to know to aid in your investigation

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points from this week edition:

Molecular characterization tools such as p146 sequencing for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) can provide insight towards investigating elimination failures or new introductions within swine herds.