Come and see UMN faculty and students at the 24th IPVS

Starting June 7th in Dublin, Ireland will be held the 24th International Pig Veterinary Society (IPVS) congress regrouping swine veterinarians from around the world exchanging and presenting the latest information relevant to the profession. Numerous members of the University of Minnesota swine group will be present and some of them have been chosen to present their work.

Indeed, Dr. Peter Davies will be talking about an 18 month longitudinal study on Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA colonization and infection in US swine veterinarians on Wednesday, June 8th at 10:30am.
Carl Betlach will be presenting his results on the evaluation of time to stability and associated risk factors in sow herds infected with PRRS 1-7-4  on Wednesday, June 8th at 1:50pm.
Thursday June 9th at 2:10pm, Dr. Fabian Chamba will share the results of his study on the effect of sow vaccination on the detection of influenza A virus in pigs at weaning.
Dr. Maria Pieters will be presenting her point of view on the management of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae gilt acclimation on Friday, June 10th at 11:30am.
Earlier in that same session, Dr. Luiza Roos will give the conclusions of her investigation on the optimal seeder-to-naive ratio needed in natural exposure to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.
Drs. Bob Morrisson and Mike Murtaugh will both be chairing sessions, on herd health management and immunology, respectively.
IPVS provides funding for younger professionals and students who would like to attend the congress. Few are selected and we are very pleased that Alyssa Anderson, a student enrolled in a double cursus (Master of Science / DVM) at the UMN received the bursary.
Come and see us in Dublin!
Edit:  Dr. Talita Rosende  will be talking on Novel RNA-based in situ hybridization for detection of Senecavirus A in pigs Wednesday June 8th at 11:30am. Do not miss out on this great presentation!

Congratulations graduates!

On Saturday, May 7th was held the graduation ceremony for the 2016 DVM students as well as for the graduate students enrolled in the VMED program.

Among them, the UMN swine group is happy to announce the graduation of Drs. Carmen Alonso, Nitipong Homwong, Catalina Picasso, and Jisun Sun.

Please join us in congratulating them for their academic success!

 

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Dr. Bob Morrison selected as Master of the Pork Industry 2016

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Dr. Bob Morrison – Picture courtesy of the National Hog Farmer

It is our distinct pleasure and a great honor to announce that Dr. Bob Morrison has been selected to be one of this year Masters of the Pork Industry. This title, delivered by the National Hog Farmer recognizes individuals who dedicated their careers to the advancement of pork production. As said by the magazine, those leaders are “professionals, entrepreneurs and family-based pork industry enthusiasts whose dedication and wisdom are sure to inspire young and old as they tackle the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in an ever-changing global pork industry.”

Among all of the great work Dr. Morrison is doing with the industry, we will mention the Swine Health Monitoring Program (SHMP), a collaborative effort from 26 pork producers who voluntarily share their data about disease outbreaks they may be experiencing. While the program started with three pork producers focusing on Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, it has expended to almost 40% of the sows in the US and has included other pathogens like Seneca Valley virus.

Under Dr. Morrison’s leadership, the Allen D. Leman conference and its counterpart Leman China have been created. Those two conferences, which motto is “science-driven solutions” aim at providing the latest and the most relevant information  in swine health and production to all of the industry players. The next conference will be held in St. Paul from September 17th to September 20th. More information can be found here.

Please join us in congratulating Dr. Morrison for this great accomplishment.

National Hog Farmer Full Article

 

 

North American swine rotaviruses: a complex epidemiology

A scientific paper published today in PLOS ONE reveals that based on three-level mixed-effects logistic regression models, the epidemiology of swine rotaviruses in North America is quite complex. The goal of the study led by Drs. Homwong, Perez, Rossow, and Marthaler from the University of Minnesota was to investigate the associations among age, rotavirus detection, and regions within the US swine production in samples submitted for diagnosis to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory.

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Percentages of Rotavirus A (RVA), Rotavirus B (RVB), and Rotavirus C (RVC) samples by state.
The color represented highest prevalence of the RV species (green represents RVA, purple represents RVB, blue represents RVC while pink represents equal percentages of RVA and RVC

Abstract: Rotaviruses (RV) are important causes of diarrhea in animals, especially in domestic animals. Of the 9 RV species, rotavirus A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) had been established as important causes of diarrhea in pigs. The Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory receives swine stool samples from North America to determine the etiologic agents of disease. Between November 2009 and October 2011, 7,508 samples from pigs with diarrhea were submitted to determine if enteric pathogens, including RV, were present in the samples. All samples were tested for RVA, RVB, and RVC by real time RT-PCR. The majority of the samples (82%) were positive for RVA, RVB, and/or RVC. To better understand the risk factors associated with RV infections in swine diagnostic samples, three-level mixed-effects logistic regression models (3L-MLMs) were used to estimate associations among RV species, age, and geographical variability within the major swine production regions in North America. The conditional odds ratios (cORs) for RVA and RVB detection were lower for 1–3 day old pigs when compared to any other age group. However, the cOR of RVC detection in 1–3 day old pigs was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than pigs in the 4–20 days old and >55 day old age groups. Furthermore, pigs in the 21–55 day old age group had statistically higher cORs of RV co-detection compared to 1–3 day old pigs (p < 0.001). The 3L-MLMs indicated that RV status was more similar within states than among states or within each region. Our results indicated that 3L-MLMs are a powerful and adaptable tool to handle and analyze large-hierarchical datasets. In addition, our results indicated that, overall, swine RV epidemiology is complex, and RV species are associated with different age groups and vary by regions in North America.

Link to the full article

Telepathology at the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

IMG_0904editedThe  Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota is equipped with the latest technology to provide their clients with the highest level of service.One of the state-of-the-art pieces of equipment available is the telepathology  installation. A first camera is set up on the necropsy floor so that the client can see the lesions as they are commented and explained in real-time by our pathologists Dr. Jim Collins, Dr. Albert Rovira or Dr. Fabio Vannucci. The second camera is connected to a microscope to display histology slides
Both cameras are supported by a software which allows the presenter to draw on the image (green circles and arrow on the picture) from the video to clarify the explanations.

Access to the telepathology website

The client has access to the real-time video feed via the link shown above after being approved by the hosting pathologist.

 

iCOMOS: One Medicine One Science

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The 2nd International Conference on One Medicine One Science will be held from April 24th to April 27th at the Commons Hotel in Minneapolis.

iCOMOS is a global forum to:

  • communicate the importance of science in solving pressing health issues at the interface of humans, animals and the environment;
  • facilitate interdisciplinary, international collaborations embracing health, science and economics;
  • inform public policy development that is necessary for preserving human and animal health.

Human and animal health care scientists and professionals, economists, trainees, environmental scientists, ethicists, public health and chronic disease specialists, and policy experts in health, agriculture, food, and environmental affairs are invited to come and exchange on this essential topic that is One Health.

Click here to see the full program.

 

Dr. Luiza Roos receives COGS grant award

 

Luiza Roos

Dr. Luiza Roos is a UMN graduate student focusing on swine mycoplasmas under the direction of Dr. Maria Pieters.

Dr. Luiza Roos received the Counsel of Graduate Students (COGS) grant award from the University of Minnesota.
This very competitive grant is offered to graduate students to help them with expenditures while they are traveling to present their research. Dr. Roos will be using the funds to attend the 2016 IPVS where she will be giving a talk on Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae gilt acclimatization.

Please join us in congratulating Luiza for her award!