MSHMP Incidence Year 2018/2019 Annual Summary

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Today, we are sharing the 2018/2019 summary for the Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Program from the MSHMP team lead, Dr. Cesar Corzo and what his vision for the future is.

Continue reading “MSHMP Incidence Year 2018/2019 Annual Summary”

Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project 2018 Summary

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr Cesar Corzo shares the summary of the year 2018 for the Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project.

During 2018 the MSHMP continued to make progress in different areas related to our main objective of developing the capacity to support the industry respond to emerging pathogens.

1) Database – Database has been structured to be able to capture a larger volume of data. This is a major step forward as we continue to work towards building the capacity of adding more sites and disease entities if needed.

2) Prospective PRRS sequence monitoring – The process of capturing diagnostic data continues, although not yet automated it is still adding sequences to the database. The database currently has 23,414 PRRS sequences from 20 systems and 21 states. Analyses of the database have begun with a subset but ultimately, we will be exploring trends and seasonal relationships involving spatialͲtemporal approaches. The database continues to provide a resource for MSHMP participants when conducting outbreak investigations.

3) Transport data capture and analysis – After a challenging year with our transport App we have decided to go back to basics and try a new approach to capturing transport data. The new approach which involves technology already validated in the trucking industry is currently being tested; we will follow up on this objective later this year.

4) Expansion – MSHMP continues to grow through three different ways:

  • 1) Current MSHMP participants continue to add new established farms,
  • 2) New participants have joined the project, two new production systems are already reporting and 2 more are in the process of providing data and
  • 3) Growing herd data inclusion into MSHMP has begun and is in the early stages as we learn how to link it with the breeding herd.

We have also continued our commitment with creating value to our producers through specific research projects that have been shared through conferences, MSHMP participant meeting during AASV and Leman Conference.

Peer Reviewed Publications

1. Vilalta C, Sanhueza J, Alvarez J, Murray D, Torremorell M, Corzo C, Morrison R. Use of processing fluids to determine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection status in pig litters. Vet Microbiol. 2018. 225:149Ͳ156. DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.09.006

2. Machado, G., C. Vilalta, A.M. Corzo, C., Torremorrell, M., Perez, K. VanderWaal. Predicting outbreaks of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus through animal movements and spatial neighborhoods. Nature Scientific Reports. Accepted.

3. Kinsley, A.C., A. Perez, M.E. Craft, K. VanderWaal. Characterization of swine movements in the United States and implications for disease control. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Submitted.

4. Sanhueza JM, Vilalta C, Corzo C, Arruda AG. Factors affecting Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus time-to-stability in breeding herds in the Midwestern United States. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2018. Dec 6. Doi: 10.11111/tbed.13091.

5. Arruda AG, Sanhueza J, Corzo C, Vilalta C. Assessment of area spread of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus in three clusters of swine farms. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2018. DOI: 10.1111/tbed.12875.

6. Arruda AG, Vilalta C, Puig P, Perez A, Alba A. Time-series analysis for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in the United States. PLoS One. 2018. 13(4):e0195282. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195282. eCollection.

7. VanderWaal, K, Perez A, Torremorrell A, Morrison R, Craft M. Role of animal movement and indirect contact among farms in transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Epidemics. 2018. 24:67-75. DOI: 10.1016/j.epidemic.2018.04.001.

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the strong team of faculty members, post-docs, students and staff that make this project possible. Additionally, this project would not be possible without the commitment of participants and practitioners and funding from the Swine Health Information Center.

Faculty: B. Morrison, C. Corzo, A. Perez, M. Torremorell, K. VanderWaal, J. Torrison and D. Linhares (ISU), D. Holtkamp (ISU), A. Arruda (OSU), and G. Machado (NCSU)

Post-Docs and Students: Carles Vilalta (Data visualization, PRRS testing), Juan Sanhueza (TTS, spatialͲtemporal analysis), Mariana Kikuti (PRRS sequence trends), Paulo Fioravante (IT Director), Emily Geary (Data manager), Kaushi Kanankege (Spatial analysis), Igor Paploski (Regional PRRS sequence analysis), Belinda Befort (Diagnostic trends)

Science Page: Incidence Year 2017/2018 Annual Summary

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr. Cesar Corzo is giving us a summary of the 2017/2018 year.

Objective 1 – Disease incidence and monitoring

PRRS – Unfortunately 31% of the herds in the project broke with PRRS making it the third highest incidence in the MSHMP history. The epidemic initiated at the same time of the year following previous years’ pattern. As with previous years, we continue to see viral introduction into 1) status 4 breeding herds in low dense regions and 2) filtered sow herds reminding us that there continues to be unanswered questions from a transmission standpoint.

PEDv – The year ended at 8% (1% increase compared to the previous year) with a series of outbreaks occurring in 12 farms that had never been exposed to PEDv.

PDCoV – Even though we have not been including a graph we continue to monitor for this virus. There has been minimal activity.

SVV – Incidence of this virus remained low and did not follow the seasonal pattern seen in the previous 2 years.

Atypical CNS Cases – These viruses continue to be found in specific cases with no apparent trend.

Objective 2 – Prospective monitoring of PRRSv

PRRSv sequences continue to be collected building a library for MSHMP participant use. We have used this approach a few times while outbreak investigations have been conducted. We are currently conducting monitoring in a three-company based region detecting newly emerged viruses. On the other hand, the database is being analyzed in a way that provides epidemiological sense. We will report more on this in an upcoming report.

Objective 3 – Develop capacity to capture and analyze movement data

We have been able to generate a process to record movement data (i.e. starting and ending location,speed, trip duration) together with a visualization package in Google Earth. Although we have proved the concept we have faced technology challenges during the development phase and we are currently revisiting our approach.

Objective 4 – To expand participation of producers to allow all to be involved

Expansion continues with existing participants adding more farms. There have been other production systems that have either signed the
enrollment forms and are in the process of submitting their data or other production companies that have verbally agreed to join.

Science Page: 2017 summary of the Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project

diagram MSHMP This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points:

  • We will remember 2017 for the loss of Dr. Morrison, in whose honor the program us now named. Dr. Andres Perez led the transition of the program and now Dr. Corzo, the new Leman Chair in Swine health and Productivity is leading the project.
  • MSHMP acknowledges and thanks all participants for their willingness to share their data to support the US industry.
  • The Swine Health Information Center (SHIC) has been instrumental for the execution of this project.

Four new participants joined MSHMP increasing the representativeness of the project by adding 64 sow farms accounting for 220,000 sows.
The weekly report capturing the changes in incidence and prevalence of important pathogens has been shared to participants (n=33) and non-participants (n=185). Now we report on PRRS, PEDv, SVA and novel viruses associated with atypical central nervous system disease.
The weekly science page featured authors from 18 institutions who explained cutting edge research findings, recent publication summaries, and breakdowns of MSHMP data.

Take a look at the report to see the 6 peer-reviewed publications generated thanks to this collaborative work.