Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project (MSHMP) 2020 Summary

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr. Cesar Corzo, in charge of the project, gives us a summary of the year 2020.

The past 12 months certainly tested the robustness of MSHMP in many ways. Most importantly, our team was able to quickly navigate through several technical challenges, as accessing and maintaining our database while working from home had not been possible prior to this year. Thankfully, we were able to maintain the data flow and provide you with the weekly report. We wouldn’t had been able to do that if it wasn’t for your commitment as well. We certainly appreciate your efforts. 

Our work has continued moving forward and we here summarize the major accomplishments throughout 2020. 

Continue reading “Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project (MSHMP) 2020 Summary”

Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project: Annual Summary (2019/2020)

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Another MSHMP year has gone by and certainly will be one to remember due to the public health emergency leading to a crisis in our industry. Today, Dr. Cesar A Corzo provides comprehensive 2019/2020 concluding remarks and project updates. Thank you to all MSHMP participants for continuing to communicate and report status changes!

Continue reading “Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project: Annual Summary (2019/2020)”

Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project 2019 Summary

Keypoints

The Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Program hit several milestones during the year 2019.

  • 3.39 million sows are part of the project
  • A new database
  • 2 new major areas of focus: sequencing and transport data analysis
  • 7 scientific and peer-reviewed publications
Continue reading “Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project 2019 Summary”

MSHMP Incidence Year 2018/2019 Annual Summary

Today, we are sharing the 2018/2019 summary for the Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Program from the MSHMP team lead, Dr. Cesar Corzo and what his vision for the future is.

Continue reading “MSHMP Incidence Year 2018/2019 Annual Summary”

Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project 2018 Summary

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr Cesar Corzo shares the summary of the year 2018 for the Morrison Swine Health Monitoring Project.

During 2018 the MSHMP continued to make progress in different areas related to our main objective of developing the capacity to support the industry respond to emerging pathogens.

1) Database – Database has been structured to be able to capture a larger volume of data. This is a major step forward as we continue to work towards building the capacity of adding more sites and disease entities if needed.

2) Prospective PRRS sequence monitoring – The process of capturing diagnostic data continues, although not yet automated it is still adding sequences to the database. The database currently has 23,414 PRRS sequences from 20 systems and 21 states. Analyses of the database have begun with a subset but ultimately, we will be exploring trends and seasonal relationships involving spatialͲtemporal approaches. The database continues to provide a resource for MSHMP participants when conducting outbreak investigations.

3) Transport data capture and analysis – After a challenging year with our transport App we have decided to go back to basics and try a new approach to capturing transport data. The new approach which involves technology already validated in the trucking industry is currently being tested; we will follow up on this objective later this year.

4) Expansion – MSHMP continues to grow through three different ways:

  • 1) Current MSHMP participants continue to add new established farms,
  • 2) New participants have joined the project, two new production systems are already reporting and 2 more are in the process of providing data and
  • 3) Growing herd data inclusion into MSHMP has begun and is in the early stages as we learn how to link it with the breeding herd.

We have also continued our commitment with creating value to our producers through specific research projects that have been shared through conferences, MSHMP participant meeting during AASV and Leman Conference.

Peer Reviewed Publications

1. Vilalta C, Sanhueza J, Alvarez J, Murray D, Torremorell M, Corzo C, Morrison R. Use of processing fluids to determine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection status in pig litters. Vet Microbiol. 2018. 225:149Ͳ156. DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.09.006

2. Machado, G., C. Vilalta, A.M. Corzo, C., Torremorrell, M., Perez, K. VanderWaal. Predicting outbreaks of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus through animal movements and spatial neighborhoods. Nature Scientific Reports. Accepted.

3. Kinsley, A.C., A. Perez, M.E. Craft, K. VanderWaal. Characterization of swine movements in the United States and implications for disease control. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Submitted.

4. Sanhueza JM, Vilalta C, Corzo C, Arruda AG. Factors affecting Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus time-to-stability in breeding herds in the Midwestern United States. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2018. Dec 6. Doi: 10.11111/tbed.13091.

5. Arruda AG, Sanhueza J, Corzo C, Vilalta C. Assessment of area spread of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus in three clusters of swine farms. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2018. DOI: 10.1111/tbed.12875.

6. Arruda AG, Vilalta C, Puig P, Perez A, Alba A. Time-series analysis for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in the United States. PLoS One. 2018. 13(4):e0195282. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195282. eCollection.

7. VanderWaal, K, Perez A, Torremorrell A, Morrison R, Craft M. Role of animal movement and indirect contact among farms in transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Epidemics. 2018. 24:67-75. DOI: 10.1016/j.epidemic.2018.04.001.

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the strong team of faculty members, post-docs, students and staff that make this project possible. Additionally, this project would not be possible without the commitment of participants and practitioners and funding from the Swine Health Information Center.

Faculty: B. Morrison, C. Corzo, A. Perez, M. Torremorell, K. VanderWaal, J. Torrison and D. Linhares (ISU), D. Holtkamp (ISU), A. Arruda (OSU), and G. Machado (NCSU)

Post-Docs and Students: Carles Vilalta (Data visualization, PRRS testing), Juan Sanhueza (TTS, spatialͲtemporal analysis), Mariana Kikuti (PRRS sequence trends), Paulo Fioravante (IT Director), Emily Geary (Data manager), Kaushi Kanankege (Spatial analysis), Igor Paploski (Regional PRRS sequence analysis), Belinda Befort (Diagnostic trends)