Clinical cases and problem-solving skills by DVM students: a new session at the Allen D. Leman swine conference

Veterinary student, did you shadow a swine practitioner this summer or were involved in an interesting clinical case investigation? Did you work on your veterinary skills by designing a differential diagnosis list or working on a treatment plan? Did you investigate a problem by analyzing production records? We want to hear about it!

Close up of microphone in concert hall or conference room

The Allen D. Leman Swine Conference is organizing a session for veterinary students to demonstrate their problem-solving skills through the presentation of a case or experience where students challenged their clinical training and problem-solving capabilities necessary for day-to-day practice. Creativity and originality in the support and delivery are encouraged. The session will take place on Sunday at the Allen D. Leman Swine Conference and will include presentations from 7 veterinary students. Students invited to present will receive a $1,000 stipend, free admission to the Leman Swine Conference, and a copy of the Diseases of Swine book (10th edition).

Submit your one page case/problem description (tests results and figures can be added in an appendix) to Dr. Perle Boyer, pboyer(at)umn.edu by August 15th at midnight and you will be notified by September 1st whether your presentation has been selected.

Both clinical cases or a production problems will be accepted for review.

Attending the Leman Conference is a great opportunity for veterinary students who want to network with industry leaders!

Any question? Feel free to contact us at pboyer(at)umn.edu! All the information can also be found on the University website.

Webinar on Senecavirus A from Dr. Sturos tomorrow 03/28 at 4pm

Matt Sturos
Dr. Matt Sturos

Dr. Matt Sturos, diagnostic pathologist at the University of Minnesota, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory will be presenting the latest information on Senecavirus A in swine, tomorrow at 4pm in a learning session organized by the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA). Participants can join in person at the MVMA conference room or online via WebEX.

 

More information here

Gary Louis, PhD confirmed as keynote speaker at the 2017 Allen D. Leman swine conference

The Allen D. Leman swine conference is only six months away! Our team is preparing an  exciting conference program for you this year and we will update you regularly on the speakers and topics that will be covered during this great event bringing science-driven solutions to the complex challenges facing the swine industry. We already shared with you that the recipient of this year’s Science in Practice award is Dr. Bob Thompson.

We are glad to announce that our first key note speaker for the conference will be Gary Louis, Executive Vice President of Seaboard Foods LLC where he is in charge of the live operations. We are delighted that he has accepted our invitation to share his tremendous experience and his vision of the swine production.

More information about the Allen D. Leman swine conference can be found here.

 

 

 

AASV 2017: Another great year for the UMN-CVM students and faculty

The UMN CVM students did a fantastic job at the 2017 American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV) meeting this past weekend. Four students presented their projects as an oral presentation. Zhen Yang, Alyssa Anderson, Hunter Baldry and Chris Deegan were all recognized by a jury for their hard work and commitment to the swine industry.
Taylor Homann, Donna Drebes, and Kevin Gustafson all got the opportunity to present their work as poster presentations.

Lastly, two out of the three awards given by Boehringer Ingelheim to advance the research on swine respiratory pathogens were given to Dr. Marie Culhane and Dr. Carlos Vilalta for their project on swine influenza and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) respectively.

Congratulations to all!

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Success for the swine graduate students at the 2017 MVMA

mvma-collage

The swine group was well represented at the 2017 MVMA meeting. Ms. Alyssa Anderson and Dr. Karine Ludwig Takeuti both gave a presentation on diagnostic tools to detect Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections. Drs. Jorge Garrido Mantilla and Fabian Chamba Pardo shared the latest update on swine influenza. Dr. Amy Kinsley explained how the structure of a swine farm can influence disease persistence. Dr. Talita Resende shared the advantages of a fairly recent diagnostic technique: in situ hybridization. Congratulations to Ms. Alyssa Anderson who also received a $5,000 Food Animal Scholarship from the MVM Foundation!

The UMN swine group will be at the 48th AASV meeting in Denver

Next week-end will start the 48th American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV) meeting in Denver, CO. As usual, numerous UMN-CVM faculty and graduate students will be attending and presenting the results of their latest research. We hare looking forward  to seeing you there!

Pre-conference seminars:

  • Doug Marthaler: Porcine rotaviruses: what we know and what we are still missing
  • Maria Pieters: Current tools to approach Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae diagnostic cases

Research topics:

  • Michael Murtaugh: Broadly neutralizing antibodies to recent, virulent type 2 PRRSV isolates
  • Michael Rahe: Characterization of the memory immune response to PRRSV infection
  • Fabian Chamba Pardo: Effect of influenza prevalence at weaning on transmission, clinical signs and performance after weaning
  • Talita Resende: Mycoplasma hyorhinis associated with conjunctivitis in pigs

Antibiotic session:

  • Peter Davies: Antibiotic use metrics

Managing the reproductive herd for high health and productivity

  • Maria Pieters: A pig’s early challenges

Student session:

  • Alyssa Anderson: Use of molecular characterization tools to investigate Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae outbreaks
  • Hunter Baldry: Evaluation of positive pressure filtration to reduce aerosol transmission of PRRSV during an experimental challenge of farm access points
  • Chris Deegan: Dynamics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonization, seroconversion and onset of clinical signs in a population of gilts under field conditions
  • Zhen Yang: Investigating Porcine Circovirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) in commercial swine herd by next generation sequencing

Posters:

  • Fabian Chamba Pardo: Influenza A virus prevalence and seasonality in midwestern US breeding herds
  • Donna Drebes: Trends in Lawsonia intracellularis PCR to the submissions to the UMN-VDL over a 10-year period
  • Kevin Gustafson: B-cell tetramer monitoring of the memory immune response to PRRSV
  • Taylor Homann: Characterizing piglet loss from PRRS outbreak

 

 

Dr. Fernando Leite receives Lynn Jones Memorial Award for Best Oral presentation at CRWAD

Dr. Fernando Leite, a PhD student under the supervision of Dr. Richard Isaacson, won the Lynn Jones Memorial Award for the best oral presentation at the 97th Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases (CRWAD). His talk entitled “Lawsonia intracellularis vaccination decreases Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium shedding in co-infected pigs” presented the results of the work  he did in collaboration with Drs. Gebhart, Singer, and Isaacson at the University of Minnesota.

Please join us in congratulating Fernando for his award!

Abstract: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Lawsonia intracellularis are two of the most prevalent intestinal pathogens of swine. S. Typhimurium causes diarrhea but also results in subclinical persistent colonization of pigs and can lead to food borne illnesses. S. enterica is responsible for over 1 million cases of food borne illness per year in the United States. L. intracellularis infection has been found as a risk factor for increased S. Typhimurium shedding in swine. The objective of this study was to investigate if vaccination against L. intracellularis could lead to decreased S. Typhimurium shedding. To test this hypothesis, groups of nine pigs were either challenged with S. Typhimurium, S. Typhimurium and L. intracellularis, S. Typhimurium and vaccinated against L. intracellularis, or S. Typhimurium L. intracellularis and vaccinated against L. intracellularis. A non-infected control group served as a negative control. Fecal shedding of S. Typhimurium was monitored using an enrichment most probable number method two days after infection and weekly thereafter until animals reached the age of 14 weeks. The co-challenged vaccinated group had a tendency of shedding the least S. Typhimurium and at one-week post infection is when the greatest differences among groups was observed and the vaccinated co-challenged group shed significantly less Salmonella (p>0.05) than the group co-infected without vaccination and the group challenged with Salmonella alone. These differences were of 1.63 and 2.12 Log10 organisms per gram of feces, respectively. The instestinal microbiome of these animals is being investigated to understand how it may have impacted Salmonella shedding levels in the different treatments. These results indicate that vaccination against L. intracellularis may aid in the control of S. Typhimurium in herds co-infected with L. intracellularis.