Litter level agreement of PRRS PCR results in testicles, tails and udder wipes samples

This recent publication by former MSHMP post-doc Dr. Carles Vilalta compares various sample types used to assess PRRS status of piglets at the litter level. The paper is available in the Preventive Veterinary Medicine journal.

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Relationships among Microbial Communities in Pigs

Today, we are sharing a recent article published in the journal Microorganisms by Dr. Valeris-Chacin and the MycoLab. The publication, available in open access, focuses on the relationships among fecal, air, oral, and tracheal microbial communities in pigs.

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Dynamic network connectivity influences the spread of a sub-lineage of PRRS virus

A study led by Dr. Dennis Makau and the VanderWaal lab was recently published in the journal of Transboundary and Emerging Diseases. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of pig movements to the risk of occurrence of PRRSV Type 2 (RFLP 1-7-4 , a sublineage of lineage 1[L1A]) in the United States. 

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Transmission of a live influenza A virus vaccine in commercial pre-weaned pigs

The Plos One journal just published a new study by Dr. Gustavo Lopez and the Torremorell lab. The objectives of the project were to  1)assess the onset and duration of live attenuated influenza vaccine shedding in vaccinated pre-weaned pigs, 2)investigate the transmission of the live attenuated influenza vaccine from vaccinated to non-vaccinated pigs under field conditions and 3)evaluate whether the live attenuated influenza vaccine could be aerosolized and detected in the environment.

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Comparison of samplers collecting airborne influenza viruses: 1. Primarily impingers and cyclones

Researchers from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and College of Veterinary Medicine are publishing a series of articles in PLOS ONE comparing the various air samplers used to detect airborne viruses such as influenza. This first publication, available in open access, focuses on impingers and cyclones.

Highlights

  • Higher quantities of virus were recovered by high flow rate samplers
  • Lower flow rate samplers performed better when virus concentrations were high
  • Based on the question of interest, a different air sampler might be more efficient.
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