PRRSV 144 L1C: A Rapid Response to a National Crisis

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

In partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA Inc., Pipestone Research has provided a rapid response to bring science-based answers to managing the emergence of PRRSV 144. Based on field observations from practitioners and producers, stating that, “This is the worst strain of PRRSV ever,” “Vaccines don’t work anymore”, and “Biosecurity protocols are ineffective,” the team determined that immediate action was needed. 

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Keeping PRRS 144 Out of Sow Herds: a podcast

Podcasts are a perfect way to get caught up with new swine information! We are presenting you the latest episode from “At The Meeting… Honoring Dr. Bob Morrison” in collaboration with SwineCast.

The emergence of PRRS 144 has increased the risks of breaks in sow herds.

Dr. Karyn Havas (Pipestone Research) and Dr. Mariana Kikuti (University of Minnesota) join The ATM team (Dr. Montserrat Torremorell – College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Dr. Gordon Spronk – Pipestone Veterinary Services, and Dr. Tom Wetzell – Swine Veterinary Consultant) to identify what producers can do to reduce the threat.

Listen to the episode (~25 minutes)

Persistent PRRS in Finishing Pigs Raises Concerns

Podcasts are a perfect way to get caught up with new swine information! We are presenting you the latest episode from “At The Meeting… Honoring Dr. Bob Morrison” in collaboration with SwineCast.

Various PRRS strains, including 144 lineage C, remain dangerously active in the Midwest pig production belt, despite a hot, dry summer.

Three veterinarians describe what they are seeing and doing to reverse PRRS-driven losses. Dr. Deb Murray (New Fashion Pork), Dr. Kat Wood (Christensen Farms), and Dr. Ryan Strobel (Swine Vet Center), have a lively and timely discussion with the The ATM team (Dr. Montserrat Torremorell – College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Dr. Gordon Spronk – Pipestone Veterinary Services, and Dr. Tom Wetzell – Swine Veterinary Consultant).

Listen to the episode (~23 minutes)

Average time sites stay in a naïve PRRSV status: Preliminary Results

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points

  • Up to February 2021, 209 breeding herd moved to a PRRS naïve status a total of 259 times.
  • On average, sites remained naïve approximately two years before changing to a different status.
  • Most naïve sites moved to an active PRRSV break status in an average one and a half years.
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Phylogenetic Structure and Sequential Dominance of Sub-Lineages of PRRSV Type-2 Lineage 1 in the United States

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Keypoints

  • Lineage 1 PRRSv, the most prevalent PRRSV lineage in the U.S, can be sub-divided into eight sub-lineages
  • We documented the cyclic emergence and turnover of different lineages and sub-lineages (about every 3 years) based on both sequence count data and estimated past viral population sizes inferred from genetic diversity through time.
  • The eight sub-lineages differed in key GP5 amino acid sites that are thought to be involved in the immune response to the virus.
Continue reading “Phylogenetic Structure and Sequential Dominance of Sub-Lineages of PRRSV Type-2 Lineage 1 in the United States”