African Swine Fever in China: a Swine Disease Global Surveillance Report

This report was published from the Swine Health Information Center and prepared by the University of Minnesota.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

There is now a second case of African swine fever (ASF) in China.  It was found in a slaughterhouse where 30 pigs died of ASF. The slaughterhouse is located in the city of Zhengzhou in the Henan province. The pigs came from Tangyuan district of the city of Jiamusi, in the Heilongjiang province, over 500 miles to northeast of the first reported herd, which was detected approximately two weeks ago.

By road, the distance from the farm to the slaughterhouse is approximately 1,400 miles, travelling through areas with high pig density. The slaughterhouse is a large commercial facility, owned by Shuanghui, part of the WH Group, the world’s largest pork producer.

china-asf-second-case-e1534428267522.png

Government officials are moving quickly to try to isolate the disease. The slaughterhouse has been closed with a no movement zone within a radius of approximately of 6 miles and a zone of 2 miles for destroying all pigs.

This news outbreak signals that there may be a number of concerns about the status of ASF in China.  The distance between the original detection in Shenyang and this newly identified farm, as well as slaughterhouse, shows that the disease is being transported widely. The areas of concern now involve multiple Chinese provinces and heighten the likelihood of further cases.

china-4-locations-interest-asf.png

4 key locations: Red dot, new ASF outbreak reported in slaughterhouse is located in the city of Zhengzhou in the Henan province; blue: first ASF outbreak reported in a small pig farm in district of Shenbei New, in the province of Liaoning; green dot: farm (owner Wang) located in the Hunnan District, Shenyang city, Liaoning province; purple: Tangyuan district of the city of Jiamusi, in the Heilongjiang province.

The Chinese press is reporting that the outbreak started as early as April of this year.  (http://www.chinanews.com/sh/2018/08-15/8600530.shtml) A partial translation is below.

The first ASF case was officially confirmed on Aug 3, 2018 on a small farm (owner Zhang) located in the Shenbei District, Shenyang city, Liaoning province.  Further investigations indicated that the owner of the ASF index farm purchased 45 pigs on July 5, 2018 from a farm (owner Wang) located in the Hunnan District, Shenyang city, Liaoning province. Fecal samples collected from Wang’s farm were confirmed ASFV RNA positive by PCR.

Wang said that the last entry of pigs onto the farm occurred on March 24, 2018. There were 100 piglets purchased from Chuanying District, Jilin city, Jilin province.  In April, some pigs started to become sick and then died on the Wang farm. Wang did not report the abnormal pig death; instead the remaining live pigs were sold to the Zhang farm in Shenyang and other people. So far, all of the pigs initially from the Wang farm have been tracked and culled.  Wang was held in a detention center due to violation of the laws.

Best of Leman 2017 series #8: B. Thompson – 25 years of experience in sow health and longevity

We launched a new series on the blog in October. Once a month, we are sharing with you a presentation given at the 2017 Allen D. Leman swine conference, on topics that the swine group found interesting, innovative or that lead to great discussions.

Our 8th presentation is by Dr. Bob Thompson, the 2017 recipient of the Science in Practice award, regarding 25 years of experience in sow health and longevity.

To listen to this talk, please click on the image below.

thompson leman 25 years xp sow longevity

The Allen D. Leman Swine Conference Introduces The Morrison Swine Innovator Prize for DVM Students

Veterinary students: Are you shadowing a swine practitioner this summer or have you been involved in an interesting clinical case investigation? Did you work on your veterinary skills by designing a differential diagnosis list or working on a treatment plan? Did you investigate a problem by analyzing production records? Share your work at the Allen D. Leman Swine Conference to win the Morrison Swine Innovator Prize!

The Allen D. Leman Swine Conference is organizing a session for veterinary students to demonstrate their problem-solving skills through the presentation of a case or experience where students challenged their clinical training and problem-solving capabilities necessary for day-to-day practice. Creativity and originality in the support and delivery are encouraged. The session will take place on Sunday at the Allen D. Leman Swine Conference and will include presentations from pre-selected veterinary students. Invited students will also be part of a dedicated workshop to enhance their leadership and communication skills, networking opportunities, and will receive a $1,000 stipend, free admission to the Leman Swine Conference, a copy of the Diseases of Swine book (10th edition), and of course the winner of the Morrison Swine Innovator Prize will receive a substantial monetary prize.

Close up of microphone in concert hall or conference room

Attending the Leman Conference is a great opportunity for veterinary students who want to network with industry leaders. Submissions to enter in the selection to present at the DVM student session at the Leman Conference should be uploaded at z.umn.edu/MSIP by August 15th at the end of the day.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Perle Boyer at pboyer@umn.edu. For more information about the Morrison Swine Innovator Prize visit z.umn.edu/MSIP.

Attending IPVS in China? Support Minneapolis 2022!

IPVS_2022.002Help us bring the IPVS back to the United States by supporting “Minneapolis 2022.” The last time the IPVS was held in the US was 2002, and before that, 1976. It’s time to bring it back!

We are thrilled to present the “Minneapolis 2022” bid at IPVS in China in June and working together with producers, veterinarians, academia and allied industry to make “Minneapolis 2022” the best IPVS ever! If you are attending IPVS China, please spread the word, join us at the booth and, of course, vote for “Minneapolis 2022” at the general meeting.

For more information: z.umn.edu/IPVSbid.

Remembering Bob, one year later

Bob_Morrison

This week marks the first anniversary of the loss of Dr. Bob Morrison. Dr. Morrison was killed in a tragic car accident in the Czech Republic in May 2, 2017.
In that same accident, we also lost Pam Wetzell and Deb Spronk, spouses of our dear friends Dr. Gordon Spronk and Dr. Tom Wetzell. We remember them in many ways especially for their kindness and love of life.

Bob was a mentor, teacher, colleague, friend and inspirational leader to many of us.

We remember Bob for his kindness, integrity, fertile mind, dedication to his students, peers and the swine industry, and for his passion to instill in others to do work that matters.

Bob is dearly missed and continues to be an inspiration to many of us.

Rest in peace Bob,

The Swine Faculty at the University of Minnesota

AASV 2018: A successful meeting in San Diego

The UMN CVM students did a fantastic job at the 2018 American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV) meeting last week. Zhen Yang presented an update on his research regarding PCV3 and got the second place in the student oral competition.
Taylor Homann received a prize for her poster presentation. Marjorie Schleper was awarded one of the 10 student scholarships given by Merck Animal Health. Hunter Baldry was recognized for the most downloaded podcast: her interview of Dr. Clayton Johnson.

Dr. Montse Torremorell shared the initiatives undergoing at the University of Minnesota in the honor of Dr. Bob Morrison.

Lastly, Dr. Juan Sanhueza received one award given by Boehringer Ingelheim to advance the research on swine respiratory pathogens for his project: “Evaluation of parity as a delaying factor to reach PRRSv stability in sow farms”. Dr. Perle Boyer received a research grant from the AASV Foundation to develop Day 1 competencies for swine veterinary graduates.

Congratulations to all!

Longitudinal study of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in a cohort of swine veterinarians in the United States

In this study conducted by Dr. Sun during her PhD under the direction of Dr. Peter Davies, 66 swine veterinarians were sampled via nasal swabs every month for 18 months. Swabs were first cultured to detect Staphylococcus aureus and to determine the strains susceptibility (or resistance) to methicillin, and then were characterized by spa typing and MultiLocus Sequence typing (MLST). Click on the banner below to read the publication in open-access.

Sun longitudinal study Saureus in swine veterinarians 2017

S. aureus monthly prevalence ranged from 58% to 82% and MRSA ranged between 6% and 15%. Those results were higher than the ones for the US population. 52% of the swine veterinarians were classified as persistent carriers, meaning that their samples came back positive for S.aureus at least 80% of the time, 47% were intermittent carriers. 21% of the veterinarians were true persistent carriers meaning that the same spa type of S.aureus was recovered each time the sample was positive.

Staphylococcus aureus positive samples repartition
Number of veterinarians based on the carrier index (number of samples positive for S.aureus divided by number of samples taken per veterinarian)

Whole genome sequencing showed that strains isolated at the beginning and at the end of the study were similar genetically. Comparing spa types, 83% of all isolates belonged to a type also present in swine.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

People working with pigs are at elevated risk of harboring methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in their nose, which is attributable to occupational exposure to animals harboring livestock adapted S. aureus. To obtain insight into the biological nature of occupationally related nasal culture positivity, we conducted a longitudinal study of 66 swine veterinarians in the USA.

METHODS:

The study cohort resided in 15 US states and worked predominantly with swine. Monthly for 18 months, participants self-collected nasal swabs and completed a survey to report recent exposure to pigs and other animals; the occurrence of work related injuries; and any relevant health events such as skin and soft tissue infections or confirmed staphylococcal infections. Nasal swabs were cultured using selective methods to determine the presence of MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and isolates were characterized by spa typing and MLST.

RESULTS:

Prevalences of S. aureus (64%, monthly range from 58 to 82%) and MRSA (9.5%; monthly range from 6 to15%) were higher than reported for the US population (30% and 1.5% respectively). Predominant spa types were t034 (ST398, 37%), t002 (ST5, 17%) and t337 (ST9/ST398 13%), a distribution similar to that found in a concurrent study in pigs in the USA. Veterinarians were classified into three groups: Persistent carriers (PC, 52%), Intermittent carriers (IC, 47%) and Non-carriers (NC, 1%). Persistent carriage of a single spa type was observed in 14 (21%) of participants, and paired (first and last) isolates from PC subjects had minor genetic differences. Swabs from PC veterinarians carried higher numbers of S. aureus. Among IC veterinarians, culture positivity was significantly associated with recent contact with pigs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exposure to pigs did not lead to prolonged colonization in most subjects, and the higher numbers of S. aureus in PC subjects suggests that unknown host factors may determine the likelihood of prolonged colonization by S. aureus of livestock origin. Exposure to S. aureus and persistent colonization of swine veterinarians was common but rarely associated with S. aureus disease.