PCV-3: Testing methods and prevalence today: A podcast episode

Since its discovery in 2015, PCV-3 has been a concern for veterinarians and swine producers worldwide. Fully knowing the impacts that PCV-2 can have on a farm, a third member of the Porcine circovirus family should be well understood. In this episode, Dr. Clayton Johnson talk with Dr. Fabio Vannucci about his work with PCV-3, different methods of testing, and how it presents itself in our swine herds.

Dr. Fabio Vannucci is an Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota. He received his DVM in 2006 in Brazil and his Master’s in Animal Pathology in 2009. His area of expertise includes food animal disease, diagnostics, and swine medicine and pathology, and lately, he has been focusing on Porcine Circovirus in the swine industry lately.

Summary: A putative PCV3-associated disease in piglets from Southern Brazil

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week we look at the results of a joint study between the Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul, Agroceres Pic and the UMN Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory that looked at the connection between newborn piglets presenting with large caudally rotated ears and PCV3 infection.

Continue reading “Summary: A putative PCV3-associated disease in piglets from Southern Brazil”

Histological Lesions and Replication Sites of PCV3 in Naturally-Infected Pigs

A team of researchers led by Dr. Fabio Vannucci investigated the lesions associated with a natural infection by Porcine Circovirus 3. They focused their study on histological lesions as well as replication sites to get a better understanding of this virus’ pathology. The article is available in open access on the journal’s website.

Continue reading “Histological Lesions and Replication Sites of PCV3 in Naturally-Infected Pigs”

Porcine Circovirus 3: a new episode from At the meeting with… podcast

microphone-2618102_1920Podcasts are a perfect way to get caught up with new swine information! We are presenting you the latest episode from “At The Meeting… Honoring Dr. Bob Morrison” in collaboration with SwineCast.

In this episode of At the Meeting honoring Dr. Bob Morrison, we share a conversation on porcine circovirus 3, or PCV3.

Dr. Montse Torremorell joins Dr. Tom Wetzel and Dr. Gordon Spronk with special guest Dr. Darin Madson, Iowa State University, to talk about porcine circovirus 3 and how it is both similar to, and different from PCV2.

Dr. Madson and the show’s cohosts discuss clinical signs associated with PCV3, including myocarditis, respiratory issues, and reproductive problems, as well as how current research is focused on better understanding the virus, its history, and whether any current PCV vaccines could offer some form of cross-protection.

Listen to the entire episode (17 minutes)

Science Page: Geographic distribution and genetic diversity of PCV3 from clinical samples in US swine farms

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, we are sharing a report by Zhen Yang a DVM/MS candidate at the UMN, regarding the Geographic distribution and genetic diversity of PCV3 from clinical samples in US swine farms.

Key Points:

  • PCV3 is widespread in the U.S.
  • Abortion cases in the study had a high rate of PCV3 positivity.
  • PCV3 found in association with lesions in an abortion case suggesting causality.

The study looked at 730 cases from the UMN Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory with a positive sample for PCV3, received between Feb 2016 and Jan 2018.

Yang PCV3 US location genetic diversity

Out of 22 states, 18 states were PCV3 positive. PCV3 was detected in pigs from all ages.

The positive rate among fetus, piglets, nursery and finishing pigs ranged from 15% to 20%. The PCV3 rate in adults was 35%.

PCV3/PCV2 co-infection rate was 5.2%, and PCV3/PRRSV coͲinfection rate was 7.6%.

In our data, we had 67 abortion cases, and 40% of them were PCV3 positive. In one abortion case investigation, histological lesions were observed in lung tissue of aborted fetus and PCV3 in-situ hybridization showed presence of PCV3 in the lesion.

Seven PCV3 whole genome sequences were obtained. Current PCV3 genomes in the U.S shared over 98% nucleotide identities. U.S strains did not cluster together and were grouped with PCV3 sequences obtained in other countries.