Characterization of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to PRRSV

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr. Jordan Young from the late Dr. Murtaugh‘s lab shares his latest research project regarding the immune response against PRRS.

Key point

  • PRRSV antibodies were determined to be broadly binding, but only homologously neutralizing, suggesting a polyclonal response, involving multiple PRRSV specific antibodies might be necessary for PRRSV neutralization.
  • This means that vaccinations aiming to protect from infection likely need to involve exposure to multiple strains of PRRSV to induce a broad protective immunity, rather than relying on single-strain vaccines.
Continue reading “Characterization of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to PRRSV”

PRRSv ORF5 difference from VR2332 by herd type

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, the MSHMP team assessed differences in ORF5 sequences compared to VR2332 based on the type of farm, the sequence was collected at.

Key points

  • Breeding herd sequences differ 8%-16% while in other herd types they differ 1%-15% from VR2332 at the ORF5 level. 
  • The larger nucleotide identity (%) range compared to VR2332 in growing pigs suggests a higher viral diversity within this group.
Continue reading “PRRSv ORF5 difference from VR2332 by herd type”

Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus associated with sudden death of swine in North America

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr. Matheus Costa from the University of Minnesota in collaboration with Dr. Brad Lage from Maple Leaf Agri-Farms share a case of sudden death due to Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

Key Points

  • Historically described as a commensal of the swine upper-respiratory tract, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus was only reported previously in Asia as an important swine pathogen. 
  • Here we report the isolation and whole genome characterization of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus associated with a sudden death outbreak in pigs in North America.
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Use of Whole Genome Sequencing during a PRRSv outbreak investigation

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

We hope our US readers had a great Thanksgiving surrounded by loved ones. We are grateful that all of you keep reading us week after week and we hope we can continue providing you with valuable content for a long time!

This week, Drs. Sunil Mor and Albert Rovira from the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory explain how we can use whole genome sequencing during a PRRS outbreak investigation.

Key Points

  • Viral recombination is documented in PRRSv
  • Whole Genome Sequencing can provide the detailed information to better understand recombination and PRRSv dynamics
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Can 2 strains of PRRSv be highly homologous but have distinct virulence?

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points

  • Two novel HP-PRRSV variants (XJ17-5 and JSTZ1712-12) that have the new genetic feature of 150-amino-acid deletion in nsp2 were identified.
  • Even though XJ17-5 and JSTZ1712-12 isolates share high genomic homology, they had distinct pathogenicity for piglets.
  • Fragment comparisons identified 34 amino acid differences between the two isolates which might be related to distinct virulence.
Continue reading “Can 2 strains of PRRSv be highly homologous but have distinct virulence?”