Understanding PRRSv diversity at the pig and litter level

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, Dr. Mariana Kikuti from the MSHMP team is sharing results from a study using whole genome sequencing to assess PRRSv diversity within and across litters.

Key points

  • Viral diversity within the piglet population is generally small, but higher diversity was found in ORFs 4 and 5a.
  • Within animal consensus changes were observed in a period as short as 2 weeks, which means piglets might be going to the GF sites with different viruses than the ones identified closer to farrowing.
Continue reading “Understanding PRRSv diversity at the pig and litter level”

How investigating the piglet helps us advance influenza control

Before we start with today’s post, we would like to wish you all the best for this new year. Thank you for your support and for reading us year after year.
So here is to a new decade, always bringing you science-driven solutions!

Weaning-age piglets are responsible for the spread of many diseases, but in the case of influenza, they are also responsible for circulating the virus within the herd. 

Continue reading “How investigating the piglet helps us advance influenza control”

Effect of Single Dose of Antimicrobial Administration at Birth on Fecal Microbiota Development and Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Piglets

It is the end of the year and to celebrate, here is one of the favorite Science Pages of the year, from Dr. Lowe’s team at the University of Illinois.

Keypoints

  • Early life antimicrobial prophylaxis had no effect on individual weight gain, or mortality but it was associated with minor shifts in the composition of fecal microbiota and noticeable changes in the abundance of selected Antimicrobial Resistant Genes
  • The shifts in fecal microbiota structure caused by perinatal antimicrobial intervention are modest and limited to particular groups of microbial taxa
  • Early life PPG and TUL intervention could promote the selection of Anrimicrobial Resistant Genes in herds
Continue reading “Effect of Single Dose of Antimicrobial Administration at Birth on Fecal Microbiota Development and Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Piglets”

Effect of Single Dose of Antimicrobial Administration at Birth on Fecal Microbiota Development and Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Piglets

This week’s Science Page presents the results of a project done by Zeineldin et al. from Dr. Jim Lowe’s program at the University of Illinois.

Keypoints

  • Early life antimicrobial prophylaxis had no effect on individual weight gain, or mortality but it was associated with minor shifts in the composition of fecal microbiota and noticeable changes in the abundance of selected Antimicrobial Resistant Genes
  • The shifts in fecal microbiota structure caused by perinatal antimicrobial intervention are modest and limited to particular groups of microbial taxa
  • Early life PPG and TUL intervention could promote the selection of Anrimicrobial Resistant Genes in herds
Continue reading “Effect of Single Dose of Antimicrobial Administration at Birth on Fecal Microbiota Development and Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Piglets”

Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae dual detection patterns in dams and piglets

Today, we are sharing an original research article published by the MycoLab and Dr. Maria Pieters in PLOS One regarding detection patterns for 2 species of mycoplasmas in sows and piglets.

The objectives of this study were to:

  • describe when Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae can be detected in piglets and is sows,
  • assess if there was a correlation between detection of the mycoplasmas in the sow and in the piglet, and
  • assess if there was a correlation between lameness and mycoplasma detection.

Conclusions

Under the conditions of this investigation, dams appeared to be consistently positive for both M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae prior to weaning.

In contrast, higher detection was observed in piglets at week 3, in comparison to week 1 post-farrowing, with M. hyorhinis, while detection of M. hyosynoviae was remarkably minimal.

The relative risk of developing lameness in postweaning piglets was highly associated with the detection of M. hyorhinis at 3 weeks of age

This research article is available in open-access on the PlOS One website.

Continue reading “Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae dual detection patterns in dams and piglets”