Piglet gut microbiota: a potential determinant for M. hyopneumoniae susceptibility

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, we are sharing a report by the MycoLab regarding piglet microbiota and its potential influence of M.hyopneumoniae susceptibility.

Key points

  • Early life gut microbiota could be a potential determinant in modulating susceptibility to chronic respiratory diseases such as enzootic pneumonia in pigs.
  • Increased abundance of short‐chain fatty acid producing bacteria in piglet gut was associated with decreased M. hyopneumoniae respiratory lesions.  
  • Understanding the function and composition of a ‘healthy’ pig gut microbiota would aid to successfully implement novel disease control strategies.
Continue reading “Piglet gut microbiota: a potential determinant for M. hyopneumoniae susceptibility”

Explore Lawsonia and the Swine Gut Microbiome: a podcast

Podcasts are a perfect way to get caught up with new swine information! We are presenting you the latest episode from “At The Meeting… Honoring Dr. Bob Morrison” in collaboration with SwineCast.

In this episode of At the Meeting honoring Dr. Bob Morrison, the group discusses the swine gut microbiome and what is considered a good or bad microbiome.

Continue reading “Explore Lawsonia and the Swine Gut Microbiome: a podcast”

Microbiome studies in swine systems: Challenges and opportunities(Part 2)

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week we are sharing part 2 of Dr. Gomez’s report on microbiome studies in swine. You may read part 1 over here if you missed last week.

Key points

  • Due to the nature of microbiome it cannot be studied separated from other relevant information and should be studied together with metabolomics, genomics, immunity and nutrition.
  • Development of models at different levels are needed to evaluate the effect on microbiome of different strategies and to evaluate the impact of microbiome changes on the pig gut health.
Continue reading “Microbiome studies in swine systems: Challenges and opportunities(Part 2)”

Microbiome studies in swine systems: Challenges and opportunities (Part 1)

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week, we are sharing part 1 of a report on the microbiome in swine production, by Dr. Andres Gomez.

Key Points

  • Microbiome and more specifically the bacteria residing in the gut play multiple roles related with nutrition and health.
  • The study of swine gut bacteria is still in its early stages, and the field contains many possibilities exciting possibilities.
  • Funding and microbiome classification are two of the most important barriers to overcome in order to gain insight into the complex field of swine gut bacteria.
Continue reading “Microbiome studies in swine systems: Challenges and opportunities (Part 1)”

Vaccination against Lawsonia intracellularis decreases shedding of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in co-infected pigs changes the host gut microbiome

This is our Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Bob Morrison’s Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

This week,  we are sharing the summary of a publication by  Dr. Fernando Leite who recently received his PhD from the University of Minnesota. The full scientific article regarding the effect of the vaccination against Lawsonia intracellularis on the shedding of Salmonella typhimurium and the host microbiome is available on open access in Nature.

Materials and Methods

A total of five treatment groups were used:

  1. challenged with S. Typhimurium alone,
  2. challenged with both S. Typhimurium and L. intracellularis,
  3. challenged with S. Typhimurium and vaccinated against L. intracellularis,
  4. challenged with both S. Typhimurium and L. intracellularis and vaccinated against L. intracellularis
  5. a non-infected control.

Results

The greatest difference in shedding level between groups was found at 7 days post-infection. At this time point, the co-challenged animals from the vaccinated group shed statistically less S. Typhimurium per gram of feces than the animals from the non-vaccinated, co-challenged group. The co-challenged vaccinated group also shed significantly less S. Typhimurium than the singly infected S. Typhimurium group.
L. intracellularis vaccination did not have a significant impact on S. Typhimurium shedding when animals were singly infected with S. Typhimurium.

Leite Ileitis vaccination salmonelle co infection

 

At 7 days post-infection, different treatment groups had significant differences in their microbiome community structure. The co-infected vaccinated group clustered apart from all other treatment groups.

Conclusion

These results indicate that vaccination against L. intracellularis impacts the microbiome and reduces shedding of S. Typhimurium in co-infected animals.