Detection of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae in oral fluids and correlation with pig lameness scores

In this newly released article from the MycoLab in the Veterinary Microbiology journal, Dr. David Pillman working with Dr. Maria Pieters shares his results regarding detection of two mycoplasma species and how this was correlated with lameness scores in nursery and finishing pigs.

Key points

  • M. hyorhinis was frequently detected in oral fluids in nursery and finisher herds
  • High detection of M. hyosynoviae in oral fluids was observed in finisher herds.
  • Proportion of lame pigs and M. hyosynoviae detection in oral fluids were correlated.
Continue reading “Detection of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae in oral fluids and correlation with pig lameness scores”

Swine conjunctivitis outbreaks associated with Mycoplasma hyorhinis

New PhD-graduate Talita Resende described in this open-access publication from the Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation conjunctivitis cases in 3 wean-to-finish barns. After extensive investigation, Mycoplasma hyorhinis was identified as a causative agent.

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Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae dual detection patterns in dams and piglets

Today, we are sharing an original research article published by the MycoLab and Dr. Maria Pieters in PLOS One regarding detection patterns for 2 species of mycoplasmas in sows and piglets.

The objectives of this study were to:

  • describe when Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae can be detected in piglets and is sows,
  • assess if there was a correlation between detection of the mycoplasmas in the sow and in the piglet, and
  • assess if there was a correlation between lameness and mycoplasma detection.

Conclusions

Under the conditions of this investigation, dams appeared to be consistently positive for both M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae prior to weaning.

In contrast, higher detection was observed in piglets at week 3, in comparison to week 1 post-farrowing, with M. hyorhinis, while detection of M. hyosynoviae was remarkably minimal.

The relative risk of developing lameness in postweaning piglets was highly associated with the detection of M. hyorhinis at 3 weeks of age

This research article is available in open-access on the PlOS One website.

Continue reading “Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae dual detection patterns in dams and piglets”

Mycoplasma hyorhinis prevalence varies based on pigs’ age

Summary

  • Mycoplasma hyorhinis can cause polyserositis and arthritis in post-weaning pigs.
  • To study M.hyorhinis‘ prevalence based on age, nasal swabs were taken from pigs at 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70 and 77 days as well as from sows, in 3 different Minnesotan herds (A, B, and C).
  • 8.8% of the sows were positive for M.hyorhinis in herds A and B whereas 3.3% of the sows were positive in herd C.
  • The percentage of positive piglets (<21 days of age) was low: between 0 and 10% depending on the herds.
  • At 28 days of age, the prevalence of M.hyorhinis in pigs increased dramatically to around 50% in herd A and 100% in herd B. After 42 days of age, the prevalence in those herds stayed above 95%.
  • The prevalence in herd C stayed close to 0% until the pigs reached the age of 77 days, time at which the prevalence increased to 100%.

Did you see our Science page on Mycoplasma hyorhinis and swine conjunctivitis?

Mhyorhinis prevalence baed on age Rovira 2017

Abstract

Mycoplasma hyorhinis is one of the causative agents of polyserositis and arthritis in postweaning pigs. Knowledge regarding colonization frequency and age distribution in modern pig production is lacking. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of M hyorhinis colonization in different age groups across three commercial pig populations. Nasal swabs were collected from sows, piglets and nursery pigs of different ages. Oral fluids were collected from nursery pigs. Necropsies were performed to assess the presence of M hyorhinis-associated disease. M hyorhinis was detected in 5/60 sows in herd A, 3/60 in herd B and none in herd C. In herd A and B, the prevalence was low in preweaning piglets (∼8 per cent) and high in postweaning pigs (∼98 per cent). A total of 7/8 oral fluids tested PCR positive in herds A and B, while 1/8 tested positive in herd C. In herd C, the preweaning and postweaning prevalence was low. In herds A and B, necropsied pigs had polyserositis lesions where M hyorhinis was detected by PCR. This study showed that prevalence of M hyorhinis colonization varies with pig age and across farms. Information generated will aid in the design and implementation of control and prevention strategies.

Link to the full paper

Science page: Mycoplasma hyorhinis and conjunctivitis in pigs

This is our new Friday rubric: every week a new Science Page from the Swine Health Monitoring Project. The previous editions of the science page are available on our website.

Key points from this week’s edition:

Conjunctivitis in pigs has been associated with various infectious agents, among them, Mycoplasma hyorhinis.
We investigated various outbreaks of conjunctivitis in pigs without apparent non-infectious predisposing factors.
Eye swabs and tissues from animals with conjunctivitis and non-affected contact pen mates were positive for M.hyorhinis by PCR and culture.
The exact role of Mycoplasmas in the development of conjunctivitis in pigs is still unclear.
The full report with pictures of the lesions is now available.