A new multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype found in Midwestern swine

Text reproduced from the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP)

A new study by Dr. Julio Alvarez‘s team from the STEMMA laboratory, published  in Clinical infectious Diseases suggests that a Salmonella strain circulating in pigs in the US Midwest is part of an emerging clade from Europe that is resistant to multiple antibiotics and may pose a public health risk.

The strain, Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, causes many foodborne disease outbreaks mostly tied to pigs and pork products and is expanding in the United States, according to the report by researchers from Minnesota and the United Kingdom.

The team used whole-genome sequencing to assess the relatedness of 659 S 4,[5],12:i:- isolates and 325 S Typhimurium isolates from various sources and locations in the United States and Europe. They also searched for resistance genes and other virulence factors and, for 50 livestock isolates and 22 human isolates, determined the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes.

The researchers found that the S 4,[5],12:i:- isolates fell into two main clades, regardless of their host or place of origin. Eighty-four percent of the US isolates recovered from 2014 through 2016, including nearly all those from pigs in the Midwest, were part of an emerging clade. This clade carried multiple genetic markers for antimicrobial resistance, including resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, and tetracyclines.

In addition, phenotypic (actual) resistance to enrofloxacin and ceftiofur was found in 11 of the 50 tested livestock isolates and 9 of the 22 human isolates. This was accompanied by plasmid-mediated resistance genes.

The authors conclude that S 4,[5],12:i:- strains circulating in Midwestern swine herds “are likely part of an emerging multidrug resistant clade first reported in Europe, and can carry plasmid-mediated resistance genes that may be transmitted horizontally to other bacteria and thus could represent a public-health concern.”

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salmonella enterica multidru resistant Alvarez 2017

Abstract

Background
Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, a worldwide emerging pathogen that causes many foodborne outbreaks mostly attributed to pig and pig products, is expanding in the U.S

Methods
Whole genome sequencing was applied to conduct multiple comparisons of 659 S. 4,[5],12:i:- and 325 S. Typhimurium from different sources and locations (i.e. U.S. and Europe) to assess their genetic heterogeneity, with a focus on strains recovered from swine in the U.S. Midwest. In addition, presence of resistance genes and other virulence factors was detected and the antimicrobial resistance phenotype of 50 and 22 isolates of livestock and human origin, respectively, was determined.

Results
The S. 4,5,12:i:- strains formed two main clades regardless of their source and geographical origin. Most (84%) of the U.S. isolates recovered in 2014–2016, including those (50/51) recovered from swine in the U.S. Midwest, were part of an emerging clade. In this clade, multiple genotypic resistance determinants were predominant, including resistance against ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines (ASSuT). Phenotypic resistance to enrofloxacin (11/50) and ceftiofur (9/50) was found in conjunction with the presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes (qnrB19/qnrB2/qnrS1 and blaCMY-2/blaSHV-12, respectively). Also, higher similarity was found between S. 4,[5],12:i:- from the emerging clade and S. Typhimurium from Europe than with S. Typhimurium from the U.S.

Conclusions
Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- currently circulating in swine in the U.S. Midwest are likely part of an emerging multidrug resistant clade first reported in Europe, and can carry plasmid-mediated resistance genes that may be transmitted horizontally to other bacteria and thus could represent a public-health concern.

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